TI OMAP 5′s 2 Cores are Twice as Fast as Tegra 3′s 4 cores

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24 Feb, 2012 9:30 pm

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Texas Instrument has been showing off its OMAP 5 processors, but they must be feeling very confident to release a video pitting the OMAP 5 against what we think is nVidia’s Tegra 3 processor.

The video shows a pair of A15 cores alongside an unspecified quad-core A9 part which we feel safe in assuming is Tegra 3. The video shows the next-gen TI part powering through the EEMBC BrowsingBench in 95 seconds, while its opposition takes a whopping 201.

What is note worthy about TI’s performance is that this spanking was performed by an 800MHz part and the four A9s were clocked at 1.3GHz. Of course, Tegra 3s are already in shipping products, while the OMAP 5 might not find a home in consumer devices before 2013.

In this benchmark, the devices handle 3 tasks simultaneously:
Rendering 20 web pages
Downloading videos
Play a MP3 file

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We know that it’ll be a while before we see OMAP 5 in products, but still, OMAP 5 renders 20 pages in 95 seconds whereas it took the NVidia Tegra 3 over 200 seconds. Can’t wait to check out products next week at Mobile World Congress.

Via CNX-Software via netbookNews.de


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  • epobirs

    Granted, TI’s per core performance may be much better but I have trouble taking this very seriously without a graph for activity across all cores on both chips during the run. I strongly suspect the quad-core chip went through the whole exercise with at least two of its cores idle or nearly so.

  • CyberGusa

     Not if it was running at 1.3GHz, the Tegra 3 usually runs each core at up to 1.4GHz but drops to 1.3 when all 4 are active.

    However, the test could have heavily favored TI depending on the network settings, memory bandwidth, and whether the test was even optimized to properly run on more than two cores.

    There’s nothing in the video to show whether the tests were fairly done.  So we’ll just have to wait for an actual product or better tests before we know anything for sure.